Workshop Techniques/Topics


Catherine Keebler at Paula's Workshop in Santa Fe


ENCAUSTIC WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES

 

 

 

All Santa Fe workshops take place Paula Roland's fully equipped studio, with amazing material resources, gorgeous rural views, and her art as inspiration.

TOPICS VARY BY WORKSHOP AND LEVEL. LINK TO CALENDAR  AND SPECIFIC WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS HERE

MOST ENCAUSTIC MONTYPE WORKSHOPS INCLUDE:

 

 

REFER TO SPECIFIC WORKSHOPS FOR TOPICS COVERED

Intermediate Monotypes and specialty workshops (Carbon Lab and Mark-making) include  new monotype techniques and some of the following:

ADVANCED AND ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOPS:

 

ABOUT ENCAUSTIC MONOTYPE PRINTING

Encaustic Monotype is an innovative, contemporary process and a painterly approach to printmaking. Experimental and freeing, the encaustic monotype may be used with a range of imagery and styles while tending toward abstraction. The process combines the ancient painting medium of encaustic with the popular monotype process. 

 

 

Encaustic paint crayons (beeswax and professional grade pigments in solid form) are used to draw upon a heated metal plate. The wax melts instantly and may be manipulated with brushes and other tools. Absorbent paper is laid on the plate and the image is transferred to the paper without a press, using only the pressure of the hand. Variations in type and absorbency of paper, work surface temperature, pigment load, and the translucency of the wax make the encaustic monotoype an excellent tool for the creative process, honoring spontaneity and the artist's intention.

 

ABOVE LEFT: Details of Palm (L) and Field (R), layered and backlit encaustic monotypes by Paula Roland, at ArtSantaFe art fair.

ABOVE RIGHT:  Language of Beauty XII, encaustic monotype on Shikoku paper,  39 x 25 inches, by Paula Roland

 

Monotype or Monoprint--are they the same? Both are prints, images that employ an intermediary step, created on a smooth substrate (the plate) and offset onto paper. Though these terms are often used interchangeably, there is a difference.                 

 
READ About Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty     

Monotypes are "one-of-a kind".  Edgar Degas and Paul Gauguin called them "printed drawings". It is the immediacy, spontaneity, and intimacy of the artist's "touch" that attracts artists and collectors to these works. Monoprints, on the other hand, have a portion of the image permanently marked into the print plate, i.e., etched or carved, and only a portion that is applied free-hand. The monoprint is part of a series, each varying slightly. 

Monoprints are editioned and limited in number which is reflected in the signing of the print. The monoprint may be traced to Rembrandt, who was able to change day to night by the way he wiped the ink on his etched plates. (Jung, William,History of the Monotype, 1996). 

Encaustic Monotypes and Monoprints are still in their infancy as an art form, unknown to many in the art world. It is exciting for artists and collectors to be present at the birth of a new and unique art process!

In Paula's ENCAUSTIC MONOTYPE WORKSHOPS, techniques build logically upon each other. You are in the hands of a veteran teacher and gain confidence as Paula helps you meet your goals and guides you to find your unique voice with the medium. These workshops are also an excellent introduction to the use of encaustic for painting, collage and mixed media.

 

 

 

Paula's personal works utilize encaustic prints in unusual and exciting ways, including installation art, large scale prints, reconfigured print collage, and combined with encaustic painting. She shares her ongoing discoveries with students and her continually updated workshops are suitable for repeating, as many do! Visit Paula's art website, PaulaRoland.com, to experience her range of accomplishment with encaustic printing and painting.

 

NO PRESS IS USED! Studying with Paula may save you months,

perhaps years of trial and error with encaustic monotype and

works on paper.

 

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